day
» » Kelly gauja (2003)

Kelly gauja (2003) HD online

Kelly gauja (2003) HD online
Language: English
Category: Movie / Action / Adventure / Biography / Crime / History / Romance / Western
Original Title: Ned Kelly
Director: Gregor Jordan
Writers: Robert Drewe,John Michael McDonagh
Released: 2003
Duration: 1h 50min
Video type: Movie
Though recognized for heroism as a lad, Ned Kelly can not escape the stigma of being the eldest of a brood sired by a known criminal. In days when an arrest equaled guilt and a conviction, his unfair imprisonment for horse thievery puts him steadfast, in the eyes of Victorian police, on the wrong side of things for life. With a sister unable to dissuade the unwanted advances of Constable Fitzpatrick, Ned, his brother Dan, and friends Joe Byrne and Steve Hart soon find themselves labeled "an outlaw gang" by the less-than-honorable constable. It's a designation they're apt to live up to after Ned's mother is unfairly arrested and sentenced to three years hard labor. In retaliation, the Kelly Gang strikes out against the oppressive Victorian government, with ultimately tragic results and passage into Australian folklore.
Cast overview, first billed only:
Heath Ledger Heath Ledger - Ned Kelly
Orlando Bloom Orlando Bloom - Joseph Byrne
Geoffrey Rush Geoffrey Rush - Superintendent Francis Hare
Naomi Watts Naomi Watts - Julia Cook
Joel Edgerton Joel Edgerton - Aaron Sherritt
Laurence Kinlan Laurence Kinlan - Dan Kelly
Philip Barantini Philip Barantini - Steve Hart
Kerry Condon Kerry Condon - Kate Kelly
Kris McQuade Kris McQuade - Ellen Kelly
Emily Browning Emily Browning - Grace Kelly
Kiri Paramore Kiri Paramore - Constable Fitzpatrick
Rachel Griffiths Rachel Griffiths - Susan Scott
Geoff Morrell Geoff Morrell - Robert Scott
Charles 'Bud' Tingwell Charles 'Bud' Tingwell - Premier Graham Berry
Saskia Burmeister Saskia Burmeister - Jane Jones

The world premier of the film, which was in Australia, took place only 2 blocks away from where Ned Kelly was hanged.

The Sydney Morning Herald suggested that Heath Ledger was made for the role because when he tried on Ned Kelly's original iron armour, it fit perfectly. Heath Ledger was quoted saying, "It was quite eerie actually ... we're the same height and the same body weight. He was skinny 'cause he was starving, I'm skinny 'cause I don't go to the gym."

Ned's original armor can be seen on display at the State Library of Victoria, Australia. Joe's armor is in the hands of a private collector. The National Trust (Old Melbourne Gaol) owns the armor believed to be Dan's. Steve's is with the Police Historical Unit (Police Museum in Melbourne).

The now blood-stained green sash Ned was given after saving a boy from drowning is on display at a museum in Benalla.

Ned said that his father had to steal a sheep to get here (Australia), and other sources mention that he stole two pigs, among other tales. John 'Red' Kelly's crime isn't certifiably known, because most of the court records were destroyed during the Irish Civil War.

The last words from Heath Ledger in the final voice-over are also the last words of Ned Kelly before he was hanged ("Such is life").

The Irish folk singer appearing in the film is Bernard Fanning.

Mick Jagger starred as Ned Kelly in the original film made in 1969.

Where Broadford is listed as a filming location, it was actually Wandong and Mt Disappointment.

Acting legend Charles 'Bud' Tingwell (who has a cameo as Victorian Premier Graham Berry) had previously appeared in another biopic about Ned Kelly: He provided the narration for Rupert Kathner's The Glenrowan Affair (1951), which starred footballer Bob Chitty as Kelly. Tingwell also narrated the documentaries Ned Kelly in Popular Culture (2003) (which appears as a special feature on the DVD release of this film) and Picture Pond Media's The Story of Ned Kelly (2002), as well as the introduction to the audiobook recording of Ian Jones' Ned Kelly: A Short Life.

The film had its world premiere in 2003 at the Regent Theatre in Melbourne, Australia. Coincidentally, the theatre is across the road from the Athenaeum Theatre, where the very first film to depict the life of Ned Kelly, "The Story of the Kelly Gang" (1906), had its world premiere on 26 December 1906.

Orlando Bloom and Geoffrey Rush were also casted for Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (2003)

Jonathan Hardy (who cameos in the film as The Great Orlando) previously appeared in another biopic about Ned Kelly: "The Trial of Ned Kelly" (1977).



Reviews: [25]

  • avatar

    Malhala

    I'm sure that not many people outside of Australia have ever heard of the legend of Ned Kelly. I once saw a documentary about the man, but that's the only time I once saw or heard anything about him. And I guess that this might be the biggest problem this movie will have to face. No-one knows anything about it and probably not many people will care about the subject.

    The movie tells the story of Ned Kelly's life. The Irish immigrant has lived in north-west Victoria all his life, but has never been very welcome by the authorities. The police always accuses him of everything they can think of and they keep harassing his family. When Kelly is fed up with the way everything goes, he forms a gang with his brother and two other men. They start robbing banks and even hijack an entire town for 3 days. All this violence leads to a man hunt organized by the police and when they kill three policemen, they are outlawed. Finally they take over a pub in Glenrowan, where they have a party with all the visitors, waiting for a train full of police to derail at a part of the track that they tore up. But the train is able to stop in time because someone warns them and what will follow is a battle on life and death between the police and the four gunmen...

    It's very hard to tell whether all of what is shown in the movie is true or false. I guess nobody really knows, because there will always be two camps who will each tell their own truth: one camp says he was a hero, some kind of Robin Hood, the others will say he was an ordinary criminal, a murderer and a thief. I really couldn't tell you which of them is right, perhaps both are, but what I can tell you is that the facts in the movie as well as is the documentary were about the same.

    This movie was a nice addition to the documentary I once saw and I really enjoyed the performances of all the actors. Heath Ledger, Orlando Bloom, Naomi Watts, Geoffrey Rush are all actors who are pretty well known, but even the lesser known actors show in this production that they all know what good acting should look like. I really enjoyed this movie and I give it a 7.5/10
  • avatar

    RUL

    Due to reading bad reviews and being told by friends that they couldn't believe how bad it was, I didn't go and see this film at the cinema. After watching it on DVD, I have to say I regret that now. I'm not saying it is brilliant, but I would venture to say that it is a good movie. I enjoyed it.

    People have skulls thicker than Ned's helmet if they go to see a movie like this and expect it to be a documentary. If you read up the actual history behind most movies based on historical figures, there is usually a huge difference between the fact and the fictional portrayal. I don't think Ganghis Kahn has ever once been portrayed even remotely close to historical fact. What kind of man Ned Kelly actually was is a matter of debate, and quite passionate it seems. In spite of the efforts of governments and some historians, Ned Kelly has become a legend. Legends are stories, and stories say as much about those who tell and listen to them as they do about the actual figure himself. Ned Kelly has become such a popular identity because he does represent that aspect of Australian culture that doesn't trust or accept authority. A society in which there is no dissent or challenge to authority is crazier and more dangerous than any bushranger.

    So not expecting this to be an accurate recreation of the historical Kelly gang, I actually found it a surprisingly unencumbered and refreshing movie. It was sentimental and romantic, but thankfully not anywhere as cheesy as it could have been; for my fellow Australians, watch 'The Lighthorseman' and you will see what I mean (it is a pity the way that story was treated so poorly). Perhaps the love affair business could have been forsaken for a bit more detail in other areas, such as the shooting of the troopers. Ironically, I actually enjoyed the movie because of that, because it would be those details that most of the focus on Ned's story would dwell. And they are the details of the story that are best discovered by reading the different viewpoints given by the various historians.

    This movie was always going to have a hard time, having make a compromise of appealing to a global movie market (to pay the pills) and the legend as it means to Australians; perhaps a little of Ned's spirit is in this movie, because I think it rebelled against people's expectations, and unfortunately missed both targets. Fortunately it made for an enjoyable quirk of a film. For me it was an unexpected kind of movie about Ned, and that is why I liked it. Orlando Bloom's performance did a lot for the movie too - he really added something. I think he would have enjoyed being the monster instead of the pretty elf, for a change.

    When you consider some other movies that are far worse than this one, your opinion of this movie should be reconsidered. Send me this on DVD for christmas rather than Croc Dundee or The Man From Snowy River anytime.
  • avatar

    Boyn

    There are few films that leave me with the feeling that Gregor Jordan's 'Ned Kelly' film did. Initially I had heard only half hearted recommendations, and decided to see it for myself. Since then, I have acquired both the video and soundtrack, and have to say that after several viewings, I am still very impressed with the underlying character of this film. It is also wonderful to see something Australian! I appreciate its down to earth quality, that if you ask me is a rarity, as well as the absence of tackiness that takes away from so many films. This film proves that you don't necessarily require fancy costumes and a glamorous set that absorbs how many millions of dollars to make a point. The cast was a bonus, including a variety of well known, and might I add, good looking people who did well to slip into the role of such unique characters. It is interesting to note, that much of the criticism regarding this film has been about who played what, and how they only said so many lines. However, if any criticism is due, it should constructively focus on the fact that a number of basic elements of the original events were excluded. In reality, these functioned to made it the hallmark that it is in Australian history. For example, on a closer examination it can be discovered that there was much, much more to the relationship between Joe Byrne and Aaron Sheritt, and that this was in fact responsible for many more of the final outcomes for the gang than were explored in the film. Also overlooked was the fact that it was not only Aaron Sheritt's efforts alone, that provided the Victorian police with their insights into the unfolding mystery. Yes, this is their interpretation of the story, and it is understandable that true stories require sensationalism and at times the modification of the original plot to grab the viewers attention. I feel that in this case, this is the only limitation. However, I can accept that perhaps historical accuracy is only of significance to those who have a particular interest in the realistic events behind a situation. It certainly inspired me to look more closely. So, watch it and decide for yourself. You might not like it at all, thats your opinion, and thats fine. Maybe it is a film that appeals largely to an Australian audience? For me, I'd call it a breath of fresh air!
  • avatar

    Tehn

    The performances were superb, the costumes delivered a unique feeling for the period and being a Victorian Living Historian, I was impressed with the accuracy of weaponry and attention to detail.

    I wouldn't say you need any knowledge of the Kelly saga to stay with the flow of this movie but to comprehend the happenings and attitudes of the time you will require a bit of basic historical knowledge. Do not expect, as some rather silly people do, any of the characters to have the Auzzie accent as we know it, it was, at that time, a country during infancy.

    OK, the story had some elements of fiction but these are required for a wider following of the film. Gregor Jordan said in the extra feature on the DVD that he wanted his movie to 'inspire an interest', and that is exactly what happened with me so this movie gets the thumbs up here.

    See it and you WILL NOT be sorry
  • avatar

    Saberdragon

    The story of Ned Kelly has been enshrouded in myth and exaggeration for time out of hand, and this film is no exception. What ensures Ned Kelly has a permanent place in history is the effort he went to in order to even the odds against the policemen hunting him. During several battles, he marched out wearing plates of beaten iron, off which the bullets available to police at the time would harmlessly bounce. Indeed, it is only because there were a few bright sparks among the Victorian police who noticed he hadn't plated up his legs that he was captured and hanged. The story has been told in schools and histories of Australia for so long that some permutations of the story have, ironically, become boring. The more the stories try to portray Kelly as some inhuman or superhuman monster, the less people pay attention.

    Which is where this adaptation of Our Sunshine, a novel about the Kelly legend, excels. Rather than attempting to portray a Ned Kelly who is as unfeeling as the armour he wore, the film quickly establishes him as a human being. Indeed, the reversal of the popular legend, showing the corruption of the Victorian police and the untenable situation of the colonists, goes a long way to make this film stand out from the crowd. Here, Ned Kelly is simply a human being living in a time and place where in order to be convicted of murder, one simply had to be the nearest person to the corpse when a policeman found it. No, I am not making that up. About the only area where the film errs is by exaggerating the Irish versus English mentality of the battles. While the Kelly gang were distinctly Irish, Australia has long been a place where peoples of wildly varied ethnicities have mixed together almost seamlessly (a scene with some Chinese migrants highlights this).

    Heath Ledger does an amazing job of impersonating Australia's most notorious outlaw. It is only because of the fame he has found in other films that the audience is aware they are watching Ledger and not Kelly himself. Orlando Bloom has finally found a role in which he doesn't look completely lost without his bow, and Geoffrey Rush's appearance as the leader of the police contingent at Glenrowan goes to show why he is one of the most revered actors in that desolate little island state. But it is Naomi Watts, appearing as Julia Cook, who gets a bit of a bum deal in this film. Although the film basically implies that Cook was essentially the woman in Ned Kelly's life, but you would not know that from the minimal screen time that she gets here. Indeed, a lot of the film's hundred and ten minutes feels more freeze-dried than explorative. Once the element of police corruption is established, in fact, the film rockets along so fast at times that it almost feels rushed.

    Unfortunately, most of the film's strengths are not capitalised upon. Rush barely gets more screen time than his name does in the opening and closing credits. Ditto for Watts, and the rest of the cast come off a little like mannequins. I can only conclude that another fifteen, or even thirty, minutes of footage might have fixed this. But that leads to the other problem, in that the lack of any depth or background to characters other than the titular hero leaves the events of the story with zero impact. One scene manages to do the speech-making thing well, but unfortunately, it all becomes a collage of moments with no linking after a while. If one were to believe the impression that this film creates, a matter of weeks, even days, passes between the time that Ned Kelly becomes a wanted man on the say-so of one corrupt policeman, and the infamous shootout at Glenrowan. Annoyingly, the trial and execution of Ned Kelly is not even depicted here, simply referred to in subtitles before the credits roll.

    That said, aside from some shaky camera-work at times, Ned Kelly manages to depict some exciting shootouts, and it has a good beginning. For that reason, I rated it a seven out of ten. Other critics have not been so kind, so if you're not impressed by shootouts with unusual elements (and what could more more unusual than full body armour in a colonial shootout?), then you might be better off looking elsewhere. Especially if you want a more factual account of Ned Kelly's life.
  • avatar

    shustrik

    I'm tired of people judging films on their "historical accuracy". IT'S A MOVIE PEOPLE!! The writers and directors are supposed to put their own spin into the story! There are a number of movies out there that aren't entirely accurate with the history....Braveheart, Wyatt Earp, Gangs of New York, Geronimo: An American Legend, The Last of the Mohicans....all fantastic films that are mildly inaccurate historically. If you want to see a few great actors do what they do best, then I suggest you see this film and don't worry about the accuracy of the facts. Just enjoy the quality of the film, the storyline and one of the greatest actors of our time.
  • avatar

    Flamekiller

    Gregor Jordan is going to be great. I have no idea when but he is heading places. Along with this I have only seen two other films he has directed which were Two Hands which was unreal to say the least and Buffalo Soldier which was bloody great and Ned Kelly.

    When first seeing this I was excited more than I should have been because I was dying to see a new western, but I don't know whether you would call this a western as it is not set in the west like other American films, this is set in Australia telling the story of legendary outlaw Ned Kelly, a young man who never got on the right side of the law who was raised from an Irish family.

    To make the film even better it is directed and starring an Australian. Heath Ledger is sporting an Irish accent in the film which is faultless.

    The supporting cast is just as good with Orlando Bloom playing Kelly's best friend Steve along with Naomi Watt's as Kelly's love interest but I wouldn't even call her that as she's not even in it. Geoffrey Rush is not used as much as he should have been as the man chasing Kelly. You feel that Gregor Jordan had the key to the sweet shop in Ned Kelly but didn't take full advantage of it. Geoffrey Rush was only in key scenes but there wasn't much introduction to who he was and his interest in Kelly like in the end when he asks Kelly if he can keep an item of his and Kelly looks at him thinking `Why'. it would have been an interest to see what he really thought of him, he just acts under orders to capture him and that's it. Naomi Watts is the same. So much there but not taken.

    As far as the story goes this is not such based on his biography but a novel written by Robert Drewe Called Our Sunshine which is a famous phrase that Ned Kelly's father called him. It's a strong story with terrific acting but the script wasn't long enough to make it into the epic it could have been. Sure enough there is plenty in the film to keep it's audience happy but it doesn't really give you the feel you are hoping for. It's goes down in the books of films that could have been so much more and even though this is still a very good film, it had the opportunity to be a masterpiece but if only the script was up to the task there would be a lot more people talking about this story.
  • avatar

    Malodora

    Based on the famous novel 'Our Sunshine', 'Ned Kelly' is a watchable film. The problem is the way the story is told. There have been quite a number of films based on heroic legends. Sadly, this one is no different and almost every moment of it is downright predictable.

    The strength lies in the portrayal of the characters. Kelly and his gang are portrayed as human beings rather than the typical ruthless heroes suffering from affective flattening. On the other hand, the screenplay is so fast paced that one wonders whether Jordan really rushed through it as 'Ned Kelly' certainly would have benefited more if the script was better developed (e.g. Julia Cook could have used more scenes). As a result the film looks more like a brief summary of Kelly's life. We don't even see the trial and execution of Ned Kelly.

    In the technical department, the cinematography, background score and beautiful locations deserve mention as they certainly add to the film's quality. There are some beautiful shots of the Australian landscape and the set design and few songs do give a feel of the time.

    Heath Ledger is adequate in the title role but it is Orlando Bloom who steals the show. The guy seems to be in complete form (unlike his awkward presence in films like 'Kingdom of Heaven') and does full justice to the part. Naomi Watts shines in a small role. Geoffrey Rush deserved a better part but the actor nonetheless stands out. Most of the supporting cast do well. However, some of the villainous corrupt cops come across as caricatures.

    Finally, Jordan's 'Ned Kelly' just doesn't do full justice in portraying Kelly's life. It ends up being a clichéd film and a mere summary of the legend. If one has nothing else to do, they might want to check 'Ned Kelly' out just to kill time but if one wants to learn about the legend, then this isn't the best source.
  • avatar

    Sat

    "Ned Kelly" is a straight-forward re-telling of the legendary Australian who has a powerful symbolism as both an outlaw and a revolutionary.

    It is not based on the award-winning novel by Peter Carey, "True History of the Ned Kelly Gang," because the rights to that were taken by the Irish Neil Jordan to the consternation of nationalists who rallied around this adaptation of Robert Drewe's "Our Sunshine." But, oddly, though Drewe is listed as a co-producer, this chronological narrative by first-timer John M. McDonagh flattens out the power of the novella's focus on the final three-days' battle that's as important to Australia as "Remember the Alamo!" is to Texans.

    Director Gregor Jordan particularly undercuts the core of Kelly's transformation in the public imagination from petty criminal to charismatic Robin Hood to uprising leader against injustice by barely letting Heath Ledger dictate a few lines of the so-called 'Jerilderie Letter' perhaps because it is the powerful centerpiece of the voice of the Carey book. Ledger's basso voice-over connectors do resonate.

    Jordan opts for portends of the key confrontation that will only be caught by those familiar with the legend -- Kelly idly looking through an illustrated book about body armor, the loading up of the infamous train that will carry the police to the attack, and Geoffrey Rush replaying his Inspector Javert, but with only implications of a "Les Miserables" back story.

    Jordan presides over an excellent recreation of the milieu of the time. There's a strong visual evocation in the art and set direction of time, place, and geography, especially with Oliver Stapleton's beautiful cinematography. The social class differences between descendants of POMmies (Prisoners of his Majesty) and their British overlords, are documented starkly, particularly in carrying over the Irish vs. British conflict to another continent (though the bland music score misses a real opportunity to illustrate that, with only a couple of traditional Celtic songs literally stuck in).

    Non-Aussie Orlando Bloom makes quite a dashing Joe Byrne, Kelly's best friend, attracting Rachel Griffiths in a somewhat silly cameo, and many other recognizable Australian actors pass through.

    Unfortunately, Naomi Watts and Ledger can be added to the lengthy list of real-life lovers who evince little reel chemistry -- did that only work to our benefit for Bogart/Bacall and Tracy/Hepburn?
  • avatar

    Punind

    The film is based on the true events life of famous 19th-century Outback bandit, an authentic legend which results to be the Australian's most ambiguous outlaw.A man(Heath Ledger)called Ned Kelly and his family are mistreated by Australians guards.He turns to stealing horses that previously have been robbed him.He gets deeply drawn into crime life and eventually becomes in policemen killings.Meanwhile he falls in love of an unhappy married rich(Naomi Watts)woman.He forms an Irish band(Orlando Bloom) battling against the British Empire but the oppressed called them heroes and are pursued by an astute,stubborn official(Geoffrey Rush,winner Oscar by Shine). The film is an Australian Western made completely by Aussies with action,drama,shoot out,love story and amount of violence.It's a pretty solid movie narrating the confrontation between the Irish rebel and the English forces and hold up very well.The essential of this picture is the outlaw hunt that results in a great load of gunplay and death. The movie benefits tremendously from Oliver Stapleton's(Casanova) frequently ravishing cinematography although is sometimes dark but longtime film is developed into the night and interior scenarios. Sensible and spectacular music by Klaus Badelt(K19,Pirates of the Caribbean).The motion picture is well shot and directed by Gregor Jordan who dramatizes accurately the life of this outlaw and his henchmen.Before adapted in Australian version by Sterling(1960) and by Tony Richardson(1970)with Mick Jagger .
  • avatar

    Manazar

    'Had Ned Kelly been born later he probably would have won a Victoria Cross at Gallipolli'. such was Ned's Bravery.

    In Australia and especially country Victoria the name Ned Kelly can be said and immediately recognised. In Greta he is still a Hero, the life Blood of the Town of Jerilderie depends on the tourism he created, but in Mansfield they still haven't forgotten that the three policeman that he 'murdered' were from there.

    Many of the buildings he visited in his life are still standing. From the Old Melbourne Gaol where he was hanged, to the Post office he held up in Jerilderie. A cell he was once held in in Greta is on display in Benella and the site of Ann Jones' Hotel, the station and even the logs where he was captured in Glenrowan can be visited.

    Evidence of all the events in the movie (except for his love interest) can be found all over Victoria, in police records and even in the Sash that Ned was awarded with for rescuing Dick Shelton from drowning. None of this is wrong, and whats left out would further justify Neds actions. The Horse that Ned 'stole' was actually stolen by Wild Wright (the man who Ned boxes with after getting out of jail). Ned was already in prison when the horse was reported stolen so he couldn't have stolen it.

    The Jerilderie Letter is more than what has been stated before. It is not self justification it is Ned's biography, an outline of what he stood for and who he was protecting. So go ahead and read it, watch the movie and then make up your mind about what Ned stood for.
  • avatar

    FreandlyMan

    "Ned Kelly" is a straight-forward re-telling of the legendary Australian who has a powerful symbolism as both an outlaw and a revolutionary.

    It is not based on the award-winning novel by Peter Carey, "True History of the Ned Kelly Gang," because the rights to that were taken by the Irish Neil Jordan to the consternation of nationalists who rallied around this adaptation of Robert Drewe's "Our Sunshine." But, oddly, though Drewe is listed as a co-producer, this chronological narrative by first-timer John M. McDonagh flattens out the power of the novella's focus on the final three-days' battle that's as important to Australia as "Remember the Alamo!" is to Texans.

    Director Gregor Jordan particularly undercuts the core of Kelly's transformation in the public imagination from petty criminal to charismatic Robin Hood to uprising leader against injustice by barely letting Heath Ledger dictate a few lines of the so-called 'Jerilderie Letter' perhaps because it is the powerful centerpiece of the voice of the Carey book. Ledger's basso voice-over connectors do resonate.

    Jordan opts for portends of the key confrontation that will only be caught by those familiar with the legend -- Kelly idly looking through an illustrated book about body armor, the loading up of the infamous train that will carry the police to the attack, and Geoffrey Rush replaying his Inspector Javert, but with only implications of a "Les Miserables" back story.

    Jordan presides over an excellent recreation of the milieu of the time. There's a strong visual evocation in the art and set direction of time, place, and geography, especially with Oliver Stapleton's beautiful cinematography. The social class differences between descendants of POMmies (Prisoners of his Majesty) and their British overlords, are documented starkly, particularly in carrying over the Irish vs. British conflict to another continent (though the bland music score misses a real opportunity to illustrate that, with only a couple of traditional Celtic songs literally stuck in).

    Non-Aussie Orlando Bloom makes quite a dashing Joe Byrne, Kelly's best friend, attracting Rachel Griffiths in a somewhat silly cameo, and many other recognizable Australian actors pass through. Unfortunately, Naomi Watts and Ledger can be added to the lengthy list of real-life lovers who evince little reel chemistry -- did that only work to our benefit for Bogart/Bacall and Tracy/Hepburn?
  • avatar

    Gadar

    Before viewing Ned Kelly, my only knowledge of this Australian outlaw was that he wore a bucket on his head. Having now seen this fairly enjoyable movie about his struggle for justice in the outback, I am a little bit more clued up; but I do have to ask how much fiction has replaced fact in this telling of the legend of Ned Kelly. Was he really so righteous, or have facts been changed to make the character more sympathetic and appealing to the audience?

    Director Gregor Jordan works well with the questionably accurate script, getting good performances from his lead Heath Ledger, who impresses with his portrayal of a man fighting the system the only way he knows how. Also worthy of mention is Orlando Bloom as Ned's friend Joseph and Geoffrey Rush as top cop Francis Hare. Naomi Watts, however, is wasted as Ned's piece of posh totty in an unnecessary romantic sub-plot.

    Whilst the movie never bores, it never really excels either, leaving this reviewer feeling rather apathetic towards it, hence my just-slightly-above-average rating of 6/10.
  • avatar

    Landaron

    I love movies based on true stories, especially history. I thought the cast was excellent, Heath Ledger, may God bless his soul, and Orlando Bloom. The Irish accents were strong and believable. I strongly recommend this movie and would love to watch it again. I picked it off of Netflix after looking for "Rob Roy" and this movie was recommended. I'm so glad I watched it, only confirming that Heath Ledger was truly an excellent actor. Naomi Watts was wonderful also. It's one of those movies that one could watch several times and still catch things missed in previous viewings. I would like to see more movies Heath performed in, as he was with us too short a time. Great movie, plot, acting, sound effects, music, etc.
  • avatar

    Abywis

    Having known nothing of the real story behind the famous Australian outlaw, I sat down to watch NED KELLY, ready to be informed and entertained. Well, I was informed, but entertained? Not particularly.

    The problem with NED KELLY is that the story is slim, the characters frankly unappealing, and there isn't really anyone to root for. Heath Ledger's almost amateurish performance in the leading role makes it hard for the reader to warm to his character, and Orlando Bloom isn't much better. Naomi Watts, as a token love interest, is even worse.

    There are flashes of drama and some decent moments, not least that climax, but too much of the production is given over to ponderous soap opera instead of hard-hitting drama. In some places, NED KELLY has a TV movie-style atmosphere, playing it safe by staying superficial instead of getting to the nitty gritty of the characters and the situation.
  • avatar

    Castiel

    Fantastic movie. One to excite all 5 senses. Is not a true historical report and not all information is to be taken as factual information. True Hollywood conventions used, like playing A list and VERY attractive actors as the 'heroes', such as Naomi Watts (Julia Cook - Ned Kelly's lover), Heath Ledger (Ned) and Orlando Bloom (Joe Byrne - Ned's right hand man), and unattractive (sorry Geoffrey Rush) actors play the drunken and corrupt Victorian Police Force. This also instills a very unreliable love story into the mix between Ned (Ledger) and Julia Cook (Watts) to entice all the romantics, females being especially susceptible. Even from the first scene, when Ned saves the fat youth from drowning and his dad calls him "sunshine" and had a "glint in his eye as he looked down at me, his hand on me shoulder," it is very romanticized and persuades viewers to side with Ned Kelly, the underdog. Besides, don't all Aussies love an underdog?
  • avatar

    Wizard

    I saw this at the premiere in Melbourne

    It is shallow, two-dimensional, unaffecting and, hard to believe given the subject matter, boring. The actors are passable, but they didn't have much to work with given the very plodding and unimpressive script. For those who might have worried that Ned Kelly would be over-intellectualised, you can take comfort in the fact that this telling of the story is utterly without any literary depth at all, told entirely on the surface and full of central casting standards. However, it doesn't work as a popcorn film either. Its pacing is too off-kilter and its craft is too lacking to satisfy even on the level of a mundane actioner.

    I very much doubt Gregor Jordan could sit back and say to himself "this is the best I could have done with the material".

    Ned Kelly is a fascinating figure, and equally so is the national response to him. Possibly folk genius, possibly class warrior, possibly psychopath and probably all these things, he has dominated Australian true mythology for over 120 years. Once again, his story has failed miserably on the big screen.

    Such is life.
  • avatar

    Benn

    I walked into this movie expecting to see a legendary Australian folktale, turned into a piece of Hollywood fluff and to an extent that is what I got. However, even with the exaggerated soundtrack and the ficticious Naomi Watts character who had too large a part in the story this movie is not with out it's charms, the image of the Kelly gang in their iron suits facing an army of Victorian police at the Glenrowan Inn is an incredably striking one.

    An important detail to note is that this is most definately NOT a documentary on Ned Kelly's life, this is a Hollywood film. However as a film it is incredably slanted to Ned's point of view, he is just way too good. Details of Ned's horse theivery (which he admitted to in the Jerilderie letter) where changed to make the Victorian police seem at fault. The Victorian police were made into the oppressors of the Kelly family and force Ned to a life as an outlaw in the bush.

    Heath Ledger's portrayal of Ned Kelly is a fair one, he manages to depict Ned's anger at the authories rather well. Orlando Bloom's portrayal of the womanising Joe Byrne and Joel Edgerton's Aaron Sherrit, betrayer of the Kelly gang, were nowhere near Oscar worthy, but still good. Naomi Watt's character was unnecessary and seemed only added to provide a love interest for Ned.

    Overall Ned Kelly is a generally good film. The acting is good, but the storyline leaves a lot to be desired, far too black and white for a film based on true events. However, the film does have it's moments, the final showdown at the Glenrowan Inn was a particulary well crafted scene. An interesting side note is that Dan Kelly's death in not actually shown, perhaps this was fuelled by the rumour that he did not perish in the Glenrowan siege but escaped and fled to a new life in Queensland.

    6 of of 10
  • avatar

    sobolica

    Those who know who know the Kelly "legend" & are hoping that this film would be an accurate depiction of his life may be disappointed with the creative license taken with this film (eg. Naomi Watt's character never existed in reality), but if you look at it purely as a piece of entertainment, it holds up pretty well. Ledgers performance in the title role is quite solid, taking the mantle of cinema's best Ned (not hard considering the previous Ned's include Yahoo Serious, Mick Jagger & former Carlton champion (Australian Rules Football) Bob Chitty, a great footballer but a poor actor. Some location shooting film in the area I live, Bacchus Marsh outside Melbourne as well as Clunes & Ballarat.
  • avatar

    Bloodfire

    I've seen the Sydney Nolan paintings. I've read the book (well, "The True History of the Kelly Gang" rather than the novel that this movie adapts). Now I've seen the movie.

    I'll see the paintings again. Maybe I'll reread Peter Carey's novel. [...]

    My problem with Ned Kelly (the movie) is that it didn't add anything to my understanding or appreciation of the historical events underpinning the story. The directors addition to the historical events not withstanding. This a problem with any historical (based-on-true-story) movie, how do you appeal to an audience that already knows the story?

    This movie is veneer.

    If you live in Australia and want to see a pictorial representation of the Ned Kelly story you can't beat the Sydney Nolan Ned Kelly series.
  • avatar

    Painbrand

    I watched this on the movies with my girlfriend at the time and I can say that I didn't have the best time mainly because I didn't know about Ned Kelly or his story.

    But since this is a biopic, it's important to at least know what to expect from the character.

    I don't know if the manner the events are told are true, or if it everything is fictional. But the way Ned Kelly is portrayed as a hero and a fighter for justice really makes me want to believe everything is true. I don't think he's portrayed as a redneck criminal or thief, but that's just my opinion.

    This is a solid Western-type movie for everybody's tastes. Heath Ledger is great as always and the sexy Naomi Watts charms the screen.

    Give this movie a chance if it airs on cable. Otherwise, I don't think I could recommend it.
  • avatar

    RuTGamer

    Ned Kelly is a fantastic film that i suggest you see. I own it on DVD and have watched it several times. I found it to be a well produced, well thought out film. One of it greatest aspects is that the producers have put in quite a decent amount of effort to make it true to history, most of the things in the film did happen in real life. Also it features fantastic cimeatography with many aspects of the Australian landscape show cased. THe music is also good, it is used mostly to set the mood and is not over the top as in some films. A lot of the music in the film is soft piano background music which compliments the film instead of taking over as music can do in some films. Overall a fantasitc movie and highly recommended.
  • avatar

    FailCrew

    This film is about the life of a young man of Irish descendant having to fight the injustice placed upon him by the police force in the colonial Australia.

    This film has many merits. For example, I particularly like the casting of Heath Ledger. He gave a good performance as a man standing up to fight against the evil. The film also had comedic moments such as the letter describing the policemen with various colourful adjectives. Pacing in the film was just right, there was a balance of the fight scenes and noon fight scenes so that the viewers have a chance to relax. The cinematography is also very good.

    The film could be a little shorter, and also could be a little brighter (most scenes do not really have to take place at night). Otherwise I have no complaints.
  • avatar

    Androwyn

    Ned Kelly is the story of the famous Australian outlaw but it shows him in such a light that you feel so sorry for him. The amazing acting that Heath Ledger gave to this film really opened him up to his outstanding reviews for this and other movies. The raw power of this movie really makes you think about how hard the Irish immigrants in Australia had it in the 1800's. Gregor Jordan spares no expense in building this film to all of its potential. Orlando Bloom does an amazing job as sidekick Joe Byrne. His suave ways of acting around women really showed Orlando's slicker side in films. Laurence Kinlan and Phil Barantini's portrayals of Dan Kelly and Steve Hart were very powerful, especially at the end when they both have to decide what to do when they are trapped in the burning bar (trying not to give anything away here!) Naomi Watts was astonishingly talented at playing Julia Cook, Ned Kelly's secret lover, of course the fact that he was actually sleeping with her off set might have helped a little bit. Over all this movie is tremendous, and I HIGHLY recommend renting/buying this film.
  • avatar

    Ce

    I recently watched a movie called broke-back mountain, starring heath ledger.I ,up to that point never heard of him. And thought he was so good in the movie I wanted to know more about him.I watched the movie Ned Kelly.Not knowing he had been an actual person and not simply a story made for Hollywood.I understand why he has become such a legend to the people not only of Australia but it seems around the world.We all have a part of Ned Kelly in us,our own basic instinct to survive when all that we are,all that we believe in ,is put to the test and circumstances not of ones making soars out of control thus leaving us vulnerable.Ned Kelly stood as a Man,and died fighting not for his life,but for justice for all.As for the movie, It was an excellent performance by all. Darlene Lee ( Seattle WA)