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Death Valley Days The Day All Marriages Were Cancelled (1952–1970) HD online

Death Valley Days The Day All Marriages Were Cancelled (1952–1970) HD online
Language: English
Category: TV Episode / Western
Original Title: The Day All Marriages Were Cancelled
Director: Hal Cooper
Writers: Kenneth Higgins
Released: 1952–1970
Duration: 30min
Video type: TV Episode
In 1850's Arizona, Charles Poston fills many positions including the ability to perform weddings. After his arrival, Father McCabe declares all marriages invalid. A trial is conducted to settle things.
Episode cast overview:
Robert Taylor Robert Taylor - Charles Poston / Himself - Host
Oscar Beregi Jr. Oscar Beregi Jr. - Charles Meyer (as Charles Beregi)
Willard Sage Willard Sage - Father McCabe
Peter Masterson Peter Masterson - Jimmy
Toian Matchinga Toian Matchinga - Maria
Pepe Callahan Pepe Callahan - Ernesto

First episode hosted by Robert Taylor.



Reviews: [1]

  • avatar

    Blackstalker

    This episode of Death Valley Days reminded me of the famous classic western which is a favorite of mine, Warlock. In that film the town of Warlock is not an official organized town, still they have to have the machinery of government to function. Wallace Ford's character in that is a judge to use their phrase 'on acceptance'.

    Robert Taylor plays Charles Poston and in 1859 Arizona which wasn't even organized as a territory yet, let alone a state, he's the alcalde of his town on acceptance. They don't even have currency there, so among other things he takes initiative of is issuing his own currency. Something Walter Huston did in his last film, another classic western, The Furies.

    One fine day priest Willard Sage comes to town and prefers charges against Taylor for performing marriages without a license. Taylor hasn't gotten around to putting a court together so druggist Oscar Beregi is made a judge.

    How this all works out is for you to see this episode for. But I will say that Taylor was one of those pioneer folks who had to do things on the fly so to speak until real law and courts arrived. He ought to have been commended for his initiative.